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Frequently Asked Questions

General Questions

Questions we are asked the most

  1. What is the advantage of a 'KeyTrainer' course?
  2. Am I eligible to attend an EDGE Services 'Key Trainer Refresher/Update'?
  3. What if I have been trained by another training provider?
  4. Are your training courses accredited? and if so by who?
  5. How do you ensure that your course materials are up-to-date and that they are of maximum benefit to those in attendance?
  6. Bearing in mind that the delegates who attend your public courses can be from very different working environments, how do you ensure that everyone's personal training needs are met?
  7. What back-up, if any, do you offer when the course is over?
  8. What is the advantage of training on an 'in-house' basis?
  9. How can you design courses to meet my organisation's specific learning needs?
  10. Do you take into account organisation's budgetary constraints?
  11. What makes EDGE Services different to other training providers?
  12. What is the advantage of a 'public course' place?
  13. What materials do you get from EDGE to deliver your own training courses?
  14. I have special learning needs. English is not my first language - will an EDGE Services course suit me?
  15. Can you supply references for training that you have done for other similar organisations?

Moving and Handling FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions with reference to issues surrounding the moving and handling of People, Children and Inanimate Objects.

  1. What is manual handling?
  2. What are the possible hazards associated with undertaking people handling activities?
  3. How many employees are injured as a result of manual handling accidents and where is this information published?
  4. How can an organisation reduce the hazards associated with people/children handling?
  5. What should people handling training include?
  6. Which professional bodies recommend training as a means of reducing the risk of people handling injuries?
  7. What are the benefits of undertaking people/children handling training?
  8. Do you ALWAYS need at least two staff to operate a hoist? Is this a legal requirment?
  9. I have heard that handling belts/slings or turntables have been 'banned' - is this true?
  10. As part of my job I move clients on a daily basis. Are we supposed to have moving and handling training?
  11. How often do you have to undertake moving and handling training and how long should courses be?
  12. At what level are risk assessment skills taught?
  13. Do your moving and handling courses include emergency evacuation skills?
  14. When were some people handling moves classed as 'controversial' and by whom?
  15. Where I work I might also be expected to undertake inanimate object handling for kitchen staff, housekeeping staff and administrative staff. Will the People/Children handling Key Trainer's course enable me to do this as well?
  16. I work in a setting where we have young adults - which of your two courses People or Children would be most suitable for me?

Understanding and Managing Behaviour that Challenges FAQs

Questions about the EDGE course

  1. Does this course deal with the restraint of highly aggressive or challenging clients?
  2. Does this course deal with understanding and managing behaviour that challenges in children?
  3. I work with adult clients who are often challenging and some of my colleagues have been hurt, are we supposed to have this training?
  4. Is the course just based on dealing with challenging behaviour from the clients we care for?
  5. I work with elderly/frail clients, would the breakaway techniques be appropriate for this work setting?
  6. When should I not use breakaway techniques or safe holds?
  7. Do I have to be super-fit to do the course as I understand there are a lot of practical skills to undertake?

General Questions

  1. What is the advantage of a 'KeyTrainer' course?

    EDGE 'Key Trainer' courses guarantee that you can maximise your investment in training by ensuring that you develop the in-house resources to train new and existing employees.

    Our Key Trainer courses not only ensure that your staff are trained appropriately for the work they are undertaking but allow them to then deliver their own training courses at times that suit you, and the rest of your employees.

    This system clearly gives you the flexibility that most companies need as well as the ability for Key Trainer staff to undertake and review risk assessments as and when they need to (as clients are admitted to you, as client's conditions change etc).

    Your Key Trainers will be supported by EDGE Services in this vital role with our unique 'post training support' system.

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  2. Am I eligible to attend an EDGE Services 'Key Trainer Refresher/Update'?

    EDGE Services issue certificates for the duration of two years for People and Children Handling Key Trainer courses, three years for our Load Handling Key Trainer events or one year for Understanding and Managing Behaviour that Challenges Key Trainer courses.

    When certificates expire we recommend that delegates attend appropriate Refresher/Update Key Trainers training (two days for People Handling; one day for Understanding and Managing Behaviour that Challenges and Load Handling ). We recognise that it is not always easy to attend set dates and therefore allow a three month window from the expiry of a certificate within which we will accept bookings. The Refresher/Update training must commence within this three month window.

    Please call us on 01904 677853 for further guidance here.

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  3. What if I have been trained by another training provider?

    There are a number of reputable organisations providing people/children handling training and understanding and managing challenging behaviour in the UK, and we are generally happy to accept individuals trained by them on EDGE Refresher/Update courses.

    We would expect delegates to have attended a four or five day initial 'Key Trainer' course and, if appropriate, one or more Refresher/Update courses of not less than one/two days duration depending on the course in question.

    The content of the initial and the Refresher/Update training courses should be broadly similar to the courses provided by EDGE Services and should have included training in relevant theory knowledge, practical skills, teaching skills and risk assessment.

    Individuals unsure as to whether their training history meets EDGE Services' criteria should contact us on 01904 677853 before confirming their booking on any of our courses.

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  4. Are your training courses accredited? and if so by who?

    Yes, all our 'Key Trainer' events have professional endorsements/accreditation and many of our one day events too.

    All our people and children handling courses are endorsed by the College of Occupational Therapists and are certified as a CPD (Continuing Professional Development) event. This means that these professional bodies look at our course materials, look at our assessment processes, look at our Trainer's CVs etc. This should give you reassurance that our training content and materials are not just considered high quality by us but by outside bodies too.

    For our Understanding and Managing Challenging Behaviour Training - our Trainers are following the strict guidelines laid down by the Institute of Conflict Management,as well as these events also being certified by the CPD.
    Your EDGE Services certificate will detail the professional endorsements to enable you to use it for your own professional development and/or your professional re-registration.

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  5. How do you ensure that your course materials are up-to-date and that they are of maximum benefit to those in attendance?

    All of our courses are updated regularly to reflect current working practices, up-to-date equipment (where appropriate) and relevant up-to-date legislation and good practice guidelines. This makes sure that all individuals learn the most effective, safest and current handling methods or most appropriate and safest ways to deal with challenging behaviour. We are committed to continuous improvement and take delegate feedback very seriously.

    All delegates on our courses are asked to complete a comprehensive post-course evaluation questionnaire which we then use to review the course for appropriate content, effective teaching style, the quality of the training materials etc.

    Each of our trainers regularly attend formal training courses, workshops, conferences and seminars as part of their continuing professional development in order to ensure that their subject knowledge is kept up to date across all their professional fields.

    You can be reassured the information you are getting from EDGE Services is up-to-date. You will also have access to our unique 'post training support' service which further enhances the benefits of an EDGE training programme to you.

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  6. Bearing in mind that the delegates who attend your public courses can be from very different working environments, how do you ensure that everyone's personal training needs are met?

    We believe taking time to understand what our delegates want to achieve from our courses is important to their success. All course delegates are provided with a pre-course questionnaire which allows us to find out about an individual persons needs. There are a number of questions on this document and we encourage the thorough completion of these to help us.

    There will also be plenty of opportunity to talk directly to your EDGE trainer about your specific training needs. By gaining this knowledge we make sure that we develop effective, focused training courses that will have a positive impact on the individuals taking part.

    Should you wish to discuss your specific training and learning needs in more detail please feel free to call us on 01904 677853 we will certainly help you with this request.

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  7. What back-up, if any, do you offer when the course is over?

    Our unique 'Post-Training Support' service, valid for the duration of your training certificate, provides invaluable support after the course has finished. Our helpful trainers are available to answer any queries you may have once you return to work and start using your new-found skills.

    Whether you want advice on people handling equipment selection, a child's manual handling risk assessment or the best way to monitor a client's challenging behaviour in the workplace...please contact us.

    You can contact EDGE Services via their phone lines, via email or this website as well as social media - Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

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  8. What is the advantage of training on an 'in-house' basis?

    'In-house' training events are advantageous for a number of reasons firstly they enable us to completely tailor the course to your organisation, talking about your client group, your risk assessment documentation, your policy/procedures etc. They are also undertaken 'in-house' so this means we are working in your environment, using your equipment etc. Finally, your staff may not need to travel which should reduce costs to you for hotels and petrol etc.

    Most organisations consider this the better way to deliver this essential staff training and depending on delegate numbers is also often the most cost effective system too.

    Call us on 01904 677853 to discuss this in more detail.

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  9. How can you design courses to meet my organisation's specific learning needs?

    We always want to have a conversation with you about your current situation to understand your training requirements and the most effective method of delivery before we make any recommendations for the type and level of training advised.

    During this conversation we try to understand the clients that you work with, the staff that you need to train and any restrictions that you may have. This enables us to make sure that your organisation gets the right training to meet their specific needs right from the start and of course maximises the benefits of working with EDGE Services.

    Please call us on 01904 677853 to have that conversation!

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  10. Do you take into account organisation's budgetary constraints?

    We understand that our training courses are required to meet legal requirements and/or moral obligations. However, we also know that justifying the expenditure can be difficult. At EDGE Services we appreciate this, and work with you to optimise the money you have available and supply you with all the information necessary to achieve budget approval.

    Please let us know if you have a budget that is not big enough to accommodate our training courses and we may well be able to offer options for you to consider. This might include particular discounted public course places or discounted weeks that we may have available. Call us on 01904 677853 - suffice to say if we can help you with this we will!

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  11. What makes EDGE Services different to other training providers?

    Creating a trusted working relationship is key to the way we operate. We never compromise on the training programmes we deliver and we provide knowledgeable and experienced trainers at all times. All our trainers have a professional healthcare qualification (backgrounds include nursing, physiotherapy and occupational therapy). All our trainers have worked clinically for over five years before joining EDGE Services. They have formal qualifications in the subjects that they train in as well as a formal teaching/training qualification and teaching/training experience of over five years.

    We employ our trainers which means that we are able to commit to quality and consistency.

    EDGE Services has been in business since 1998 and has been at the forefront of high quality training to the healthcare and social care sectors as well as special educational needs for all this time.

    In a nutshell we can be trusted to deliver a high quality product.

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  12. What is the advantage of a 'public course' place?

    Our public courses are conducted across the UK at up to 14 different locations (number not applicable to all our courses). These are generally major cities with consideration given to easy access and/or easy parking. Utilising one of our public courses is the most effective way of training smaller numbers (up to 4) as you are purchasing individual places. You just turn up to be trained! you do not have to provide a venue, equipment or catering all of this is provided for you.

    Check this website for a training event near you.

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  13. What materials do you get from EDGE to deliver your own training courses?

    All our Key Trainer events give you a CD ROM with up to nine different folders of course materials that you can reproduce for your own training courses. These include:

    Proposed courses - agendas and intended learning outcomes.Course handouts for both theory and practical skills.Course power point slides.Workbooks (to enable staff to work independently through the theory content).Sample risk assessments.Sample certificates...and much more.
    You also get over one hour of filmed practical techniques to help remind you of the techniques your EDGE Trainer taught you.

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  14. I have special learning needs. English is not my first language - will an EDGE Services course suit me?

    We certainly try to meet everybody's needs on an EDGE Services training course and in the past we have adapted our training materials. We have supplied large font course material, different coloured paper for course books, used alternative fonts and type settings. We have made arrangements for another person to read test papers and write down answers if required, we can give you more time to complete any written assessments. We have supplied a hearing loop on our public courses.

    In a nutshell we believe we have met all requests to ensure our training events are fully inclusive.

    Please call us on 01904 677853 to discuss your particular needs in detail ahead of your training and we will try to do everything in our power to help you successfully achieve success on your chosen course.

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  15. Can you supply references for training that you have done for other similar organisations?

    EDGE Services have been in operation since 1998. In this time we have worked with thousands of different organisations including individual care homes, large care home groups, NHS Trusts - acute and community, domiciliary care organisations, hospices, special needs schools, social services and local authorities, young disabled supported living organisations and residential homes, care charities...the list goes on!

    Many organisations we have worked with for well over a decade which we hope is testament to the quality training they receive from us. Please call us on 01904 677853 and we will happily supply references for any type of organisation.

    We also have a regularly updated selection of testimonials on this website too.

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Moving and Handling FAQs

  1. What is manual handling?

    Under Regulation 2 of the 'Manual Handling Operations Regulations (as amended), 1992' (MHOR, 1992) 'manual handling operations' are defined as the 'transporting or supporting of a load (including the lifting, putting down, pushing, pulling, carrying or moving thereof) by hand or bodily force.' The 'load' in this respect could be an inanimate object, a person or an animal.

    In a nutshell then manual handling in the workplace is you shifting something whilst at work. UK legislation concerns itself with 'hazardous workplace manual handling'. Hazardous being anything that could cause harm. This type of handling is generally where the training, workplace supervision, risk assessments, equipment provision, etc focus on.

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  2. What are the possible hazards associated with undertaking people handling activities?

    The key hazard associated with undertaking people or children handling activities is that the move may go wrong. The handler may slip or trip, as may the person you are handling; alternatively either party may adopt, even momentarily, poor posture, for instance an awkward twist or overreach. Any of these events could result in a severe muscular-skeletal injury to the person or handler or both. Recovery from such an injury could take several months or even years to fully recover from. In some extreme cases, a full recovery never occurs.

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  3. How many employees are injured as a result of manual handling accidents and where is this information published?

    Annual Health and Safety Executive (HSE) statistics regularly indicate that large numbers (thousands) of staff across the health care services, social care sectors and education settings who experience injury and/or ill-health as a result of hazardous manual handling activities.

    The HSE statistics are published annually on their website www.hse.gov.uk usually around October/November. The statistics are quite detailed breaking them down into separate industries, types of injury, time off work etc. These can be reproduced for training purposes or to feature in your health and safety policies/procedures/audits or reports etc.

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  4. How can an organisation reduce the hazards associated with people/children handling?

    Client-based, holistic handling risk assessments and thorough company-wide handling policies/procedures are both required in order for an organisation to arrive at informed safer handling decisions.

    These decisions should take proper account of both the safety of employees and the needs and preferences of the people for whom they are moving and handling, and forms the basis of reducing the hazards associated with all handling activities in the workplace.

    Of course effective training and supervising of staff as well as provision of well-maintained equipment will all help to reduce the hazards also.

    Other factors have an impact as well including effective health surveillance of staff, good housekeeping at work sites and a robust clothing and footwear or uniform policy/procedure as well as many other considerations.

    Basically the reduction of hazards here is a multi-factor approach. No one solution is going to work in isolation.

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  5. What should people handling training include?

    Several relevant and professional bodies including the Royal College of Nursing, the Chartered Society of Physiotherapists, the College of Occupational Therapists, the National Back Exchange and the Health and Safety Executive in conjunction with other associations and professional bodies, have advised as to the content of people handling training.

    Generally, the advice given is that the practical skills of safer people moving and handling, including the key principles of human movement and the correct selection and safer use of handling aids, should be the key focus of the course content.

    However, the course theory content may also include the employer's and employees' legal responsibilities, ergonomic and risk assessment principles, back care, spinal mechanics and function and local policies and procedures including accident/incident reporting.

    Depending on the duration of the training, other subjects covered may include risk management skills, creating effective change and the use of assessment tools for practical techniques.

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  6. Which professional bodies recommend training as a means of reducing the risk of people handling injuries?

    The following professional organisations/bodies, among others, all offer information which recognises the benefits of effective and thorough people handling training;

    • The Chartered Society of Physiotherapy
    • College of Occupational Therapists
    • The Health & Safety Executive
    • National Back Exchange
    • The Royal College of Nursing
    • Care Quality Commission (England), Care Inspectorate (Scotland), Care and Social Services Inspectorate (Wales)
    • The Institute of Occupational Safety and Health
    • The Royal Society for the Prevention of Injuries

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  7. What are the benefits of undertaking people/children handling training?

    An effective training and supervision programme coupled with the use of appropriate handling aids should benefit all the staff and the persons being moved within an organisation.

    From the staff's point of view, heavy, back-breaking moving and handling tasks should reduce. Sickness and injury levels should also reduce, as should accident and incident levels.

    The employer will see better attendance, safer working practices, fewer accidents and incidents to process, and are less likely to have a legal claim made against them in court.

    The immediate benefit to the person being moved should be an improvement in the quality of their care. Most dependent individuals will appreciate being moved more safely and comfortably in a hoist. Others could be encouraged to be more independent with their mobility, and will benefit both physically and mentally, reducing the side effects associated with reduced mobility and contribute towards physical rehabilitation programmes.

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  8. Do you ALWAYS need at least two staff to operate a hoist? Is this a legal requirment?

    You do not necessarily always need two (or more) staff to operate a patient hoist safely unless your own organisation's health and safety and/or manual handling policy specifies this and of course some do.

    UK workplace legislation does not make it a requirement to always operate a patient hoist with two members of staff. Legislation specifies this decision should be made by the risk assessor following a thorough assessment of all the key hazards and then detailed their findings in the individual client's assessment and/or care plan documentation.

    Of course many elderly and frail clients in particular would need two or more staff to assist them during a hoisting transfer as this remains a complex handling activity with a significant risk of high level harm should it go wrong.

    However at this moment in time it is not 'illegal' to hoist someone with just one handler. Check you organisations policy on this subject though before proceeding.

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  9. I have heard that handling belts/slings or turntables have been 'banned' - is this true?

    Very unlikely, unless your own organisation's policy states this. Rarely are any manual handling aids 'banned' they are, of course, inanimate and will not in themselves cause harm. The harm caused is by the handler/s and is often because of a lack of training and/or supervision in the equipment's safe use.

    However, such statements can take a life on of their own and a bit like a game of 'Chinese whispers' people hear a vague rumour that a particular client does not like using a handling belt perhaps, to handling belts can hurt a client if used incorrectly, to handling belts can cause harm, to handling belts are illegal! and these four statements started in the same place! you can see how these things can happen.

    These first three statements are not necessarily wrong but this is not the fault of the handling belt as such, it may be that it is being used incorrectly or being used for the wrong type of client.

    If you hear a rumour about a particular handling product causing problems then check the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency at www.mhra.gov.uk which is a government agency responsible for ensuring that medicines and medical devices work and are acceptably safe. If a particular handling aid has caused significant problems when being used it will be highlighted on this website. Otherwise we would suggest it may be a training and staff supervisory issue to ensure the equipment in question is being used as it should.

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  10. As part of my job I move clients on a daily basis. Are we supposed to have moving and handling training?

    The risk of injury from moving and handling activities will be increased where employees do not have information or training necessary to enable them to work safely. Under the 'Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974' (Section 2) and the 'Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations, 2006' (Regulations 10 and 13). Employers are required to provide their employees with health and safety information and training. This should be supplemented as necessary, with more specific information and training on manual handling injury risks and prevention, as part of the steps to reduce risk required under Regulation 4 of the 'Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992 (as amended).

    Client (people/children) moving and handling is defined in legislation as 'hazardous' therefore the need to properly manage this hazard is key to ensure the organisation is operating within the confines of the law. One key way to manage this is to provide training and instruction to staff to ensure they are working safely and reducing the hazards to the lowest level possible.

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  11. How often do you have to undertake moving and handling training and how long should courses be?

    Many professional bodies advise that people moving and handling training is undertaken every year. The duration of such training commonly varies between 3 to 12 hours each year often with the initial training or induction course being 6 hours plus. Organisations commonly detail the frequency and duration of this training in their policy/procedures on the subject.

    Load or inanimate object handling training tends to be conducted less frequently as the hazards are inherently less significant particularly within the care and education sectors. Training might be 3 to perhaps 6 hours in duration but most commonly undertaken every two or three years. Once again guidance on this may well be found in your organisations relevant policies/procedures.

    However, if you work in Wales or Scotland your organisation may be further governed by the Welsh and Scottish manual handling passports, check this out with your organisation as guidance on course duration's is detailed in these documents too.

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  12. At what level are risk assessment skills taught?

    On our 'Key Trainer' events we are teaching you risk assessments skills to a mid-range level, that is to say we feel certain that if you are successful on this event you will be able to participate in risk assessing to any situation up to a very complex scenario. More complex adult and children risk assessments should be undertaken by clinical professionals such as OTs, physios and nurses.

    Should you require more complex risk assessment skills then we are able to offer an additional day whereupon we will use the extra time to practice, using scenarios, complex risk assessment understanding and writing skills.
    Please call us on 01904 677853 for further information.

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  13. Do your moving and handling courses include emergency evacuation skills?

    Emergency evacuation skills training does not generally fall under the remit of 'moving and handling'. Whilst we recognise you have to move the person onto the evacuation aid - because you are doing this quickly (it is a life threatening situation after all!) to a certain degree the 'rules' of safer moving and handling do not apply. In some extreme circumstances you might have to manually lift a person to move them at speed and this is not taught on moving and handling training events - nor indeed is it practiced for obvious reasons.

    The real skills here are the safest use of the emergency evacuation aid that you have available to you. There are a wide variety on the market and each one is operated differently that is to say some wrap the feet/legs/arms, some fasten the feet/legs/arms, some aids you slide, others you roll on castors. Therefore we would advise the best people to train you in emergency evacuation skills are the suppliers/manufacturers of the particular aid/s you are using. These organisations often have videos that you can utilise for training purposes as it would be unsafe to use a person to practice on. Contact them directly for help and advice here - their contact details should be on the aids themselves.

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  14. When were some people handling moves classed as 'controversial' and by whom?

    With the publication of various editions of the 'Guide to the Handling of People' (BackCare) over the past 30 years a number of previously seen people handling moves were classed as 'controversial' or unsafe. These moves have been found to potentially cause serious harm to the client and/or to the handlers/care staff by a number of professionals contributing to these text books.

    Some of these moves were classed as unsafe as far back as 1981 - others later.

    Check out the latest edition of this text book for the most up-to-date information here.

    Further guidance should be sought from your organisations manual handling or health and safety policy/procedures as sometimes the use of these moves is permitted in life-threatening/emergency situations and you should be guided by their advice here.

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  15. Where I work I might also be expected to undertake inanimate object handling for kitchen staff, housekeeping staff and administrative staff. Will the People/Children handling Key Trainer's course enable me to do this as well?

    You will receive a good range of course materials including a number of images for practical load handling techniques which will enable you to train these members of staff as well as those undertaking people/children handling activities. Information about the key principles of biomechanics and risk assessment is given on our four day events and is also relevant to load handling of course.

    However, we are not able to assess you to undertake practical load handling techniques as part of a 'usual' four day course, we simply do not have the time within the confines of this already full course agenda (a five day event can be undertaken which does include assessment of load handling activities and will be reflected in your certificate from this event should you need this to a higher level. Contact us on 01904 677853 for further advice on this.)

    However, assuming that the training you are onward delivering is at a reasonably basic level we feel that you will have everything you would need to deliver such an event if you have successfully completed our four day course.

    You might commonly be expected to undertake just a half day (3 hour) training session for this group of staff. This half day session would usually involve 30 minutes or so of theory and 2 to 2.5 hours of practical skills.

    To assess staff effectively have a range of commonly moved inanimate loads available to demonstrate and train with. These might include boxes of 'stores' items, full laundry bags, hoovers, oxygen cylinders, sacks of vegetables, lunch trolleys/trays, medical notes and x-ray plates, items of furniture etc. These will all enable you to demonstrate safer and effective lifting and lowering, pushing and pulling as well as team handling all of which will help staff to work more safely when undertaking these tasks in the workplace.

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  16. I work in a setting where we have young adults - which of your two courses People or Children would be most suitable for me?

    Our "Children Handling and Risk Assessment Key Trainers Certificate" and the associated Refresher/Update event cover handling the young adult as well as smaller children. This course tends to focus on the 3 to 19 age group. Many of our delegates come from "special need" schools where they might have pupils with this age range. However, you might also want to consider our people handling key trainer courses as many teenagers have adult dimensions and would therefore be handled in the same way. If you attend this course we can give you a set of the course materials for children handling too on request - it really depends on the dimensions of the young adults you are handling as to whether you feel they are more adult or children.

    You are very welcome to call us on 01904 677853 to discuss this further.

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Understanding and Managing Behaviour that Challenges FAQs

  1. Does this course deal with the restraint of highly aggressive or challenging clients?

    No, the course is based on communication skills, simple breakaway skills ('light' wrist grabs, clothes grabs, simulated hair pulls etc), safe holds and escorting. We generally deliver this training to staff who care for elderly clients with dementia or some learning disability settings - this course is not a restraint course we are not aiming it at staff who deal with high levels of anger/aggression in their workplace.

    If you have any concerns about whether this course is suitable for your workplace needs please call us on 01904 677853 we will happily advise you here.

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  2. Does this course deal with understanding and managing behaviour that challenges in children?

    No, EDGE Services trainers do not have the required work experience to offer this training in children or young adult settings.

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  3. I work with adult clients who are often challenging and some of my colleagues have been hurt, are we supposed to have this training?

    There is a duty of care under several pieces of UK legislation that states employees should have systems in place to manage hazardous workplace activities and this is the duty of care of the employer.

    If staff are facing hazardous situations with challenging behaviour being directed at them then this would be classed as 'hazardous' and indeed should be managed.
    Many professional bodies (Royal College of Nursing, Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, the Health and Safety Executive to name but a few) cite training as one of the ways to do this, so yes this training or training like it should be available to you.

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  4. Is the course just based on dealing with challenging behaviour from the clients we care for?

    No, the skills taught on this course in de-escalation and effective communication can be used with the public, family and staff members. EDGE Services are very aware that care staff may come across a number of people in the course of their work who are displaying behaviour that challenges them and we want you to have the skills to manage these situations wherever and whenever they present themselves.

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  5. I work with elderly/frail clients, would the breakaway techniques be appropriate for this work setting?

    Yes, this course type is absolutely relevant here. The entire course is focused on this client group. Gentle releases are taught for elderly clients as part of the practical skills component which ensures that there is no/little harm caused to either the client or the member of staff in executing these moves. Breakaway moves are taught as a last resort but their focus is very much on absolutely limiting the harm to both parties.

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  6. When should I not use breakaway techniques or safe holds?

    Breakaway techniques should only be utilised in self defence, or to defend another person who is vulnerable and is potentially being harmed. They could be utilised as an absolute last resort when all other attempts at de-escalation and effective communication have failed. This is the only situation where you could consider the practical breakaway techniques or release of a hold and you should follow the techniques exactly as you have been advised to in your training.

    Practical techniques such as 'safe holds' should never be used for staff convenience to get somebody out of bed at a particular time or down to the day room for their lunch as examples. They should not be used to facilitate personal care, getting someone cleaned up following incontinence or getting somebody dressed who does not want to do so.

    These situations need to be considered very carefully, with thorough clinical risk assessments being completed. EDGE will gladly suggest where you can get help here to assist with these situations - please call us on 01904 677853.

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  7. Do I have to be super-fit to do the course as I understand there are a lot of practical skills to undertake?

    No, you do not have to be super-fit to participate safely in this training. The course is classed as static training, which means that everything is at a low-level physically, very controlled and always using using loose grips. The physical exertion is very limited.

    No hair is pulled and no-one is strangled. No-one goes to the floor and no one is held on the floor as this is not a restraint course. There is absolutely no risk of harm outside any other low-level physical activity and therefore you do not have to be super-fit to undertake this course.

    Whilst there are practical techniques this is not the focus of the course and you will be given clear instructions of what is expected, and indeed not expected, of you physically throughout the event.

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